Collaborations don’t need timelines

In January, I declared 2017 the year of no networking.

Two years into San Francisco life, I swore off “networking” events and took a step back from teaching at General Assembly. I started studying data science and started writing on a consistent basis.

I recently took time to reflect on the most memorable moments in San Francisco. For me, it’s easy to fill my time with speaking events, coffee dates and tech events. However the most interesting moments have been spent writing in San Francisco and checking out talks at City Arts & Lectures. Ira Glass, Jennifer Doudna, and most recently JJ Abrams and Andy Cruz.

For me personally, these talks have very practical applications for personal and professional life. Personal storytelling is an art that takes a lot of practice. After hearing Jennifer Doudna, I reached out to Hillary Wicht to diligently work on my voice and personal storytelling.

Most recently, I learned from JJ Abrams and Andy Cruz’s talk that “collaborations don’t need timelines.” Meaningful collaborations take time.

Collaborations don’t need timelines 

One of my first projects at Expedia was the creation of a global partner program. Our goal was to monetize our web traffic, social channels and other owned properties with global partners like tourism boards, hotel chains and airlines. Coming from a performance marketing background, I wanted to create a highly profitable media network to fund my future growth experiments. Early tests were successful, particularly in emerging markets where US partners were not familiar with platforms like WeChat. But the key was audience, timings and measurable outcomes.

Too many collaborations dilute your brand

With my performance marketing hat on, I only thought about scale and efficiency. The primary metrics were return on ad spend and direct revenue from partners, however a secondary metric was repeat partner activity. Media Solutions become a highly profitable channel, however I feared our brand was becoming diluted. As you start to scale, it becomes harder to find companies with an audience and design that complements your brand.

In my particular case, this led to early influencer marketing tests where we created a network of influencers and partners paid a premium for on-brand creative.

The “x” collaboration model is broken

In a world with so many collaborations, brands are seeing audience fatigue. Big retailers like Target and H&M saw success with early collaborations, however today we’re seeing fewer more strategic partnerships like Target’s collaboration with mattress company Casper.

“Following a 10-or-so-year run of nearly constant collaborations from many a fast fashion retailer, the status of the designer x mass-market retailer situation is up in the air a bit. It seems the days of Missoni for Target-induced hysteria are gone… A trending hashtag does not ensure sell out status of a collection.” [The Fashion Law]

For Abrams and Cruz, they presented a new concept that flips our traditional view of collaborations. Often times, collaborations are not created for the consumer.

The collaboration is purely a creative escape for the artists. 

Over a number of years, Abrams and Cruz have developed a wonderful friendship with no true business collaboration yet. Cruz described this by saying “collaboration doesn’t need focus groups or timelines.” To create an authentic collaboration, you need time.

Go deep and perfect your craft 

This is something I’ve been exploring for a while.
There’s a misconception that building a network means going wide. But as you become more skilled in your craft, it’s more important to go deep.

Cruz talked about starting with a shared philosophy to give you structure and community. When you start with a common ground, it establishes credibility and empowers you to evolve your personal style over time.

The key is to keep doing the work and go deep to perfect your craft. When you find someone with a shared philosophy and exceptional craft, then keep working until the collaboration comes to life. If that person happens to be JJ Abrams, then you’re just pretty damn lucky.

In 2017, Distrust has gone viral

In 2017, distrust has gone viral. Companies are blowing up on social media and trust is at an all-time low. This presentation looks at the top reasons why your customers don’t trust you. Learn ways to build trust into your product and improve your customer experience.

Please contact me for speaking opportunities or workshops. brianne.kimmel@gmail.com

 

Cleveland Hipster in Residence

The North Coast is a new destination for many travel geeks. With annual conferences like Content Marketing World every September, Cleveland is quickly becoming a surprisingly hip weekend experience. Just remember to keep your Chef Curry shirts at home.

Much like San Francisco, the best bars, restaurants and shops are tucked away in neighborhoods. So I asked Cleveland Hipster in Residence (my brother) for his go-to’s.

Hipster in Residence (@PJKimmel)

Where to Wifi 

When you’re in a city like Cleveland, it’s easy to get sucked into a Starbucks. Avoid the downtown area and find a local roaster instead.

The Loop – local art, vinyls and a quiet upstairs (Tremont)

Phoenix Coffee Bar – rooftop, record player and a nitro toddy (Ohio City)

Hip light bulbs
Beanie wearing bearded barista
Stop for the Insta

Passenger’s Cafe – local beans, bagels and breads.

Check out the chalk bored and disloyalty card. Trey (the coffee guy) was previously at Micro Roaster of the Year Award winning Gimme! Coffee in New York City. Mark (the hostel guy) has traveled to over 70 countries and stayed in ~100 hostels.

Together, they’re cool AF.

Passenger’s Cafe
The real deal (pop tarts)

Where to stay

The Kimpton Schofield Hotel – newest hotel in Cleveland (opened 2016)

Located in a circa 1902 landmark building, the Kimpton is a 7-minute walk from Playhouse Square and less than a mile from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. 

The hotel has a retro-chic feel with midcentury design and comic books scattered throughout the hotel.

Cleveland is behind on boutique hotels compared to cities like Pittsburgh with Ace Hotel and Hotel Monaco. For a local experience, Airbnb is best.

Ohio City and Tremont are both walkable neighborhoods with plenty of local cafes, art galleries and farmer’s markets.

Iron Chef Michael Symon rents out his personal home in Tremont from $90 per night.

Michael Symon’s personal kitchen (on Airbnb)

A few locals to follow

The best way to avoid tourist traps in Cleveland is to connect with a few locals.

@WhyCle – neighborhood events from #LocalCLE (food, wine and non-profit fundraisers)

@CSledzik – breweries, bars via Untappd and food trucks (enough said?)

@BikeCLE – neighborhood tours of CLE + local tips (fun fact: I met Anne in 2011 and took an early tour when she was just getting started.)

@CLEFoodTrucks – find them, try them all.

Know someone else I should add to the list? @briannekimmel with an intro!

Questions, comments, complaints? Blame @PJKimmel.